NVIDIA Brings AI to ICML in Sydney

NVIDIA will be bringing together the best of minds and technologies in the field of AI to the International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML) in Sydney, Australia from August 6 to 11.

Nearly 3,000 attendees are expected to attend, consisting of faculty, researchers and PhD students in machine learning, data science, data mining, AI, statistics, and related fields.

The NVIDIA booth, located at Level 2 in The Gallery,  will be a showcase of exciting demos – many on display in Australia for the first time – highlighting how GPUs can unlock the immense possibilities of AI by speeding up processes from years to just weeks and days. These include 4K style transfer, self-driving auto using the Drive PX2 AI car computing platform, AI at the edge, DeepStream, NVIDIA GPU Cloud, NVIDIA Isaac (Video below: NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang announcing the simulator earlier this year at GTC), and the new NVIDIA DGX Station.

In conjunction with ICML, the NVIDIA Deep Learning Institute (DLI) will offer a one-day “Scene Description Generation with Tensor Flow” hands-on workshop on August 10 from 9am to 5pm. Register here.

Those keen on joining NVIDIA can drop by the booth  August 7 to 9, 3 to 4pm, and meet with a recruiting manager to learn more about career opportunities for developers.

At ICML, developers can promote their GPU-accelerated accomplishments and research results under Share Your Science by completing this form. NVIDIA has arranged for a video crew to help developers share their story on August 7. Come by the NVIDIA booth before August 7 to schedule an appointment.

Developers can also join the NVIDIA Developer Program to establish a working relationship with NVIDIA engineering. Being part of the program gives them access to an extensive range of NVIDIA software and technology updates.

About Brad Nemire

Brad Nemire
Brad Nemire is on the Developer Marketing team and loves reading about all of the fascinating research being done by developers using NVIDIA GPUs. Reach out to Brad on Twitter @BradNemire and let him know how you’re using GPUs to accelerate your research. Brad graduated from San Diego State University and currently resides in San Jose, CA. Follow @BradNemire on Twitter